• New survey shows a majority of people would get a COVID-19 vaccine.
  • But people are not optimistic that one is likely to be ready by the end of 2020.
  • For those who wouldn’t get the vaccine, concern about side effects was the most commonly cited reason.

A new Ipsos survey, conducted on behalf of the World Economic Forum, shows that three-quarters of adults would get a vaccine for COVID-19 if it were available.

But nearly two-thirds (59%) don’t think one will be available by the end of 2020.

The study, which covers nearly 20,000 adults in 27 countries, also reveals where in the world take-up would be strongest.

Would you get a COVID-19 vaccine?

Of those surveyed, 74% strongly or somewhat agreed with the statement “if a vaccine for COVID-19 were available, I would get it”.

In China, this figure rose to 97%, but was lowest in Russia, Poland and Hungary.

Coronavirus china virus health healthcare who world health organization disease deaths pandemic epidemic worries concerns Health virus contagious contagion viruses diseases disease lab laboratory doctor health dr nurse medical medicine drugs vaccines vaccinations inoculations technology testing test medicinal biotechnology biotech biology chemistry physics microscope research influenza flu cold common cold bug risk symptomes respiratory china iran italy europe asia america south america north washing hands wash hands coughs sneezes spread spreading precaution precautions health warning covid 19 cov SARS 2019ncov wuhan sarscow wuhanpneumonia  pneumonia outbreak patients unhealthy fatality mortality elderly old elder age serious death deathly deadly
Global Attitudes on a COVID-19 Vaccine interest in getting vaccine.
Image: Ipsos

If not, why not?

The survey also asked those who said they wouldn’t get the vaccine why they wouldn’t consider it.

Globally, 56% said they were worried about the side effects, 29% had concerns about its effectiveness and 17% said they were against vaccines in general.

Coronavirus china virus health healthcare who world health organization disease deaths pandemic epidemic worries concerns Health virus contagious contagion viruses diseases disease lab laboratory doctor health dr nurse medical medicine drugs vaccines vaccinations inoculations technology testing test medicinal biotechnology biotech biology chemistry physics microscope research influenza flu cold common cold bug risk symptomes respiratory china iran italy europe asia america south america north washing hands wash hands coughs sneezes spread spreading precaution precautions health warning covid 19 cov SARS 2019ncov wuhan sarscow wuhanpneumonia  pneumonia outbreak patients unhealthy fatality mortality elderly old elder age serious death deathly deadly
Ipsos Survey for WEF reasons for not getting a vaccine.
Image: Ipsos

But will it be ready?

Nearly 3 in 5 adults don’t think a vaccine will be available to them by the end of 2020.

But, as with interest in getting a vaccine, China stands out. Nearly 90% of those surveyed strongly or somewhat agreed a vaccine is likely to be ready.

Coronavirus china virus health healthcare who world health organization disease deaths pandemic epidemic worries concerns Health virus contagious contagion viruses diseases disease lab laboratory doctor health dr nurse medical medicine drugs vaccines vaccinations inoculations technology testing test medicinal biotechnology biotech biology chemistry physics microscope research influenza flu cold common cold bug risk symptomes respiratory china iran italy europe asia america south america north washing hands wash hands coughs sneezes spread spreading precaution precautions health warning covid 19 cov SARS 2019ncov wuhan sarscow wuhanpneumonia  pneumonia outbreak patients unhealthy fatality mortality elderly old elder age serious death deathly deadly
Ipsos Survey for WEF vaccine ready 2020.
Image: Ipsos

Numerous pharmaceutical companies are working on vaccine trials and candidates, while organizations like the World Health Organization (WHO), Gavi and CEPI are also working to develop a vaccine and ensure any future solution is available for those most in need.

Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General, has warned about the risks of “vaccine nationalism: “Sharing finite supplies strategically and globally is actually in each country's national interest,” he said in August, as he urged WHO Member States to join the COVID-19 Vaccines Global Access (COVAX) Facility.